Never a dull moment

Busy, busy, busy.  That’s my life.  I don’t know if this semester is easier or I am used to having very little (and I mean VERY little) free time. It’s hard to believe this week is my last week of practicum.  I’ve been looking forward to this for EVER! But when we were on a bus coming back from our field trip, I told a couple of the students it was my last week, they got pretty upset.  The rest of the ride they just laid their heads on me.  Although, they could have been exhausted from me dragging them all around the Kohl Children’s Museum all day.  (I’ll go with they were sad because I’m leaving). On the upside, when practicum is over, I can work out every morning!!!

This week is also when Lollapalooza tickets go on sale.  Already? I’m still paying off LAST years Lolla tickets!!!  As much as I love the whole 3-day experience, I don’t think I can afford it this year.  Also, I’m not that into the headliners that have been announced.

I like Kings of Leon, but I’ve seen them multiple times already and I’m not sure that they have come out with a ton of new stuff recently, either.

Lollapalooza 2013

I’d see Eminem but it’s definitely not something I’ll be upset about missing.

Arctic Monkeys, they’re ok.

Skrillex….yea…I don’t really listen to techno or dubstep or whatever kind of music he makes.

Moving on…St. Pattys was fun! I had a blast with my cousin and my boyfriend.  We went to The Kerryman, Glascotts, and OF COURSE Pie-eyed Pizzeria!
Lastly, this week my favorite little guy in the WHOLE WIDE WORLD is turning 3!!!! I can’t believe it! I started nannying him when he was just 4-5 months old.  HAPPY BIRTHDAY SAM!! I love you stinker!

 

In defense of the English major

♪♫♪ Caught by the light, aware but asleep…

As a science major and pre-med student, something I hear often from my peers who are taking the same challenging courses as me is the remark that English majors will never know the difficulty of upper level biology, organic chemistry, or physics courses. During physics class the other day I heard a student remark, “It must be really nice to be an English major—you read some stuff and write some essays the night before they’re due for an A.”

That struck a nerve with me. I know several people who are majoring in English, and it is neither less challenging nor less important than any other subject. It bothers me that some students are so quick to criticize other disciplines of study because it seems easier than their own. A student’s goals are his or her own concern, so attacking someone’s education by dismissing it as easy or useless seems like a vindictive way to feel superior to someone else. Everyone is on a different path, so comparing yourself to others really helps no one.

There are a lot of aspects to the English major that I feel go largely unrecognized. On a surface level, it may seem easy to simplify the work level into reading books and writing papers, but what English majors are really able to accomplish is so much more impressive. A year ago as a freshman, I strongly considered double majoring in Biology and English, but my major choices have changed since then as I keep trying to trip my way to a major I’m most comfortable with. However, I still have a strong love for literature and writing that I defend most ardently.

First of all, I think the most impressive aspect of an English major is that nearly everything you are graded upon is done so subjectively. Unlike biology, chemistry, physics, or other science courses that use practice of formulas or other concepts, there is absolutely no way you could memorize or “practice-problem” your way to a good grade. Of course grammar and mechanics are important to use correctly, but those are just the nuts and bolts that anyone could learn. You have to whole-heartedly put your thoughts out for judgment by a new professor or TA for every class without knowing the values or ideals of whoever will be reading and grading your work. Moreover, these graders have probably read thousands of essays and analyses on the same topics with years and years of experience on the novel, poem, or play you are examining. In order to receive a good grade, the English student must somehow discern an original thought, support it, and put it on paper in ink. Their ideas are completely put out, open for judgment. There is no clear-cut right or wrong answer, which makes grading so much more difficult to predict. As someone who took ENGL 241 (English Literature I, Beginnings through Milton) last year, I know how nerve-wracking it was the first time turning in a pivotal essay and not really knowing what to expect for a grade. Was my writing style acceptable? Were my ideas and analysis developed, or were they too elementary?

These papers are a direct reflection of your thinking. While I have heard students say, “It’s just BS-ing some ideas about what this imagery and tone mean in this story.” But to demean this kind of writing as trite “BS” is drastically undermining what writers are doing. It’s extremely impressive to be able to write something that takes a stance that you may or may not even agree with. It may be even very obviously wrong and lacks proper support, but the amazing thing about English majors is that they will be able to effectively formulate a coherent argument on paper to make you believe it. This skill is incredibly important for everyday interactions – to be able to analyze someone’s argument without immediately refuting it. You are able to consider another side and truly understand someone’s viewpoint instead of just listening to come up with a counterpoint to argue with.

Another incredibly awesome part of studying English is that everything you do, see, hear, study, and experience is relevant. Whether it is directly literary or not, anything can be applied to the human condition and the world around us. Does that sound easy and generalized? Maybe, but it’s also so interesting to see something completely unexpected and unrelated somehow tied back into an essay. English majors are able to take the information from ridiculous places and relate it back to the topic that they are studying. Suddenly, the study of the momentum a car hitting a truck feels from physics could be worked into a paper on Shelley’s Frankenstein, or maybe the ancient Egyptian perspectives of beauty could somehow be brought up in a paper on Jane Austen…the possibilities are endless. Everything an English major student can be relevant. There’s no sheet of relevant formulas to memorize, no reagents or product patterns to commit to memory, and no definite A-Z definition of what might be important or not. These students have memorized information from their other courses to the extent that they are able to incorporate it into their everyday thoughts, interpretations, and writing in a seamless manner. That is probably the most impressive thing about the English major itself – that even though you can never memorize your way to an A, the heart of your writing is based on a much deeper level of memorization that you’ve relied on all your life.

Finally, the English major is a pursuit of passion. A student who chooses to major in English is doing so because they want to, not for the money. This may not be as true for many science, math, or engineering fields where many students are trying to secure a good job after graduation. When you walk into an English class, you’ll find a diverse group of people from all kinds of backgrounds with different interpretations of the content of the course. In this way, every single English class that is taught will always be a little different than any other. Each individual of the class will frame their experience into what they are learning.  In the end, that’s what I believe makes majoring in English the real challenge. It’s the experience of incorporating your experiences in the world around you into your writing in order to make it more convincing.

…In the memory it’s deeper, survived by a name ♪♫♪

(Caught By The Light – The Boxer Rebellion)

Spring Break has Sprung!

It’s officially time for Spring Break! As always, I’ve got plenty of ways for you to utilize your time off of school in the best way possible. The break will go by incredibly quickly, and then we’ll be on to our last month or so of the 2013-2014 academic year. Make sure to accomplish a lot from your to-do list (or at least from my list for you!) so that you are ready to come back to school on the 31st all ready to go!

Saturday, March 22nd: A great way to start break is with a clean mind. Clean our your backpack, folders, pencil cases, etc. Whatever it is, it’s bound to have some things you definitely don’t need to hold on to anymore. Reorganize them and throw out anything of no relevance; this will prepare you for the end of the school year and will allow you to go back to school with a refreshed mind.

Sunday, March 23rd: While you’re on the mini-spring cleaning kick, try doing the same in your bedroom. Go through and get rid of clutter . Even rearrange the furniture in your room. This will help you lose some of those winter blues and could very well inspire you to study or do homework in the space. It’s always nice to switch things up a little.

Monday, March 24th: At this point, you’ve been working pretty hard each day. Take a break from all of the efforts and plan a movie marathon. Take some time (or the entire day!) to start watching movies from the list you’ve been meaning to see. You deserve the break after the stress of midterms and school in general. Make sure there’s a nap or five built into there as well.

Tuesday, March 25th: Now that you’re reenergized from all of your time laying around watching movies, take a trip out and get things you need to survive a Chicago spring. If the next season is anything remotely as extreme as our winter weather, I’d be worried and expecting much more precipitation. Make sure you have a handy pair of rain boots and/or a jacket with a hood! We’re probably in for it all over again.

Wednesday, March 26th: Time tickets for class registration went out this week. That means everybody is getting ready for the upcoming year. Take the break to look at course descriptions as well as your DARS. This way, when it’s time to come back from break and register for classes, you’ll be more than ready.

Thursday, March 27th: All that thinking about school has probably got you ready for yet another break! Use spring break to prepare for a small roadtrip or a large vacation in the summer. If you’ve worked hard this year, you certainly deserve it.

Friday, March 28th: Take care of yourself! At this point, school is just around the corner. Go for a whole new perspective by getting an awesome new haircut or getting a massage. Whatever it is that helps you relax and unwind, try it. Self-care is really important, and spring break is a great time to stop what you’re doing and care for yourself.

Saturday, March 29th: There are officially two days left to break. So sad. Learn a new recipe for some type of food that will help you cope with the fact that you’ll be back to work sooner than you may want to be. Treat yourself!

Sunday, March 30th: Last day! Take this time to reflect on your time at UIC thus far and prepare for your future. Think about what things you hoped to accomplish while at college (specifically at UIC) and write them down somewhere where you can review them. This time goes by incredibly fast and it’ll be over before you know it. Take advantage of living in the city and of the fact that you go to such an awesome schooll!

And just like that, it’s time for class all over again. But not for long! Make sure you enjoy your short but sweet spring break!

How to properly cram before your test

I am going to share with you all how I cram before an exam. Cramming for quizzes is the same method, but that it is done the night before and not a week before. My cramming for exams is ALWAYS going to start 1 week (okay, maybe 5 days before, but close enough) before test day, and here’s how it works!

RULES TO STICK BY AND CAUTIONS TO BE AWARE OF:

  1. IGNORE EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING. You only have 1 week or less for that exam? Do not take any more commitments! I usually do because I’m super nuts and psycho, but I highly do not recommend this. You’ll regret it very much. Your focus needs to be on the exam.
  2. GOT MORE THAN 1 EXAM ON THE DAY OR THE WEEK? PLAN TO MULTIPLY THE HOURS OF STUDYING BY 2 or 3. This is a common issue that arises among taking classes that are not spread apart (for example, someone might plan their schedule out to fit four classes ONLY on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Is that smart? Well it’s nice to have MWF, especially if you are a commuter, but those Tuesdays and Thursdays are probably going to be the worst days of the week for literally every week until the semester is over (and this can totally be worth it if you need those huge time gaps to work or study for an exam like the MCAT, but again, not my case). Anyway, you’ll just have to repeat the steps I’m going to mention by each exam you are preparing for.
  3. TAKE PRODUCTIVE BREAKS. These include eating food, using the restroom and/or stretching and taking deep breaths. Beyond that, nothing is productive.
  4. LIMIT CHECKING EMAIL TO 2X/DAY. I can’t be away from email because it piles up so quickly and I have to respond to a million people, but when time is crucial and I really have to buckle down, I don’t even think about what I need to do. I just do it.

THE GAME PLAN:

  1. PULL OUT YOUR CALENDAR AND MAKE THAT STUDY SCHEDULE. I don’t know what I would do without Google Calendar and my phone. It keeps my on track and makes me feel good when I complete tasks or get through certain things during my day (I delete it after so that I feel accomplished).
  2. STUDY SCHEDULE BREAKDOWN. Each day should be focused on a topic. While it’s a goal to cover everything each day, it’s way too much for your brain. So, for example, if you have exams every five weeks (like anatomy and physiology), your first day should be lectures from the first week, the second day should be lecture from the second week, etc. You will go over all of your notes and slides / lecture material by reading it out loud, especially with someone in your class if possible (so helpful). Review is always number one.
  3. PAST EXAMS. More likely than not, someone has a past exam that you can either find online or through academic centers / upperclassmen. I hope you got these prior to the semester, but it’s never too late to look around! If there’s 8 exams available, each day take 2 exams by yourself.
  4. THAT’S BASICALLY IT. You’d think I’d have some crazy magical way of doing it, but not really. This method is so straightforward, but the most important thing is during your studying that you review what you do not know (and if that’s everything, you better make flash cards or say it 100 times to yourself until it’s in your brain…draw if you have to!). Your confidence should boost near the end of the cramming week, assuming you really devoted the hours to go in the order that I explained. Listen to lecture capture if you have that for your classes. Rewrite your notes (waste of time after awhile, but eh).
  5. OKAY, ALMOST FORGOT. If the instructor of the class posted a study guide, DO THAT FIRST! That’s the single best source to study from, for obvious reasons. I don’t think I ever got a study guide from an instructor that was unhelpful. They didn’t make that to throw you off. That’d be kind of stupid (and please report it if you believe so because that’s not fair). They made it to help you, so use it to your advantage.

I hope this helps anyone who has their exams coming up. Papers are a different realm, but basically I recommend the same time frame. The writing center has openings so please make appointments there! You can do online appointments if you can’t go in person, and if a day is filled, you can drop in or sign up to receive texts when an opening arises.

Spring break in a few days! MCAT too. EEP! xD

And the job hunt begins…

It’s crazy to think that I have a little less than two months until I graduate! After coming to the realization of the approaching date, I have now begun the job hunt.

I think that this is an ideal amount of time to begin looking for jobs. It’s not too early so that being a candidate for a job would impair me due to some jobs needing to hire ASAP., and it’s not too late that I will be off their radar. Now is the right time to get serious in looking for a place to start my post-graduate career.

Of course, it’s not going to be easy at all. I still have classes and homework, an internship, and student government to focus on, amongst other life activities. Finding the time to research the abundance of companies out there hiring will not be easy. Fortunately, I have a good idea about what I want to do – public relations, media marketing, or social media. Also, I have my resume all ready to go for applications. But if finding and applying for jobs is anything like applying for internships, then I’m in for a lengthy process!

I am grateful that UIC offers plenty of opportunities for graduates. The Office of Career Services offers so many great services for students: career fairs, resume reviews, moc-interviews, and plenty plenty more! I have participated in most of these and I can assure you they do help.

Despite being freaked out at first thought about job applications, I take a deep breath and think about all of my assets: plenty of internship experiences, great extra-curricular experiences, and a good academic standing. With all of this mind, I just have to focus, be confident, and rock the job hunt NOW!

Until next time…

Mike

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Everything is green today! Clothes, food, the Chicago River, beer.  I’m not Irish at all.  But I sure do like to celebrate St. Patty’s Day.  I never really knew anything about St. Patrick, other than something about snakes.  Snakes? Yea…snakes.  Let me start from the beginning.

A brief history: St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland.  Although, he wasn’t Irish OR a very devout Christian.  He was born in Britain but kidnapped at the age of 16 by a gang of Irish raiders. He spent the next years of his life in captivity. That is when he turned to religion. He ended up escaping and returning home to Britain.  Although, he later went back to Ireland where he began to spread the Christian word.  He is also known for driving snakes out of Ireland.  “Wait a minute…there aren’t any snakes in Ireland!?” Right. And there may have never been any.  However, many old pagan religions have symbols of serpents that they worshiped.  So, perhaps driving the snakes out of Ireland was merely symbolic of St. Patrick abolishing paganism in Ireland and converting the people to Christianity.  Did you know the original color associated with St. Patrick was blue? So, how did green come to represent the holiday?  Green became associated with St. Patrick due to the landscape of Emerald Isle and the shamrock.  A shamrock (or clover), having 3 leaves, is said to be how St. Patrick taught the pagans about the Holy Trinity. People would put shamrocks on their clothing which turned into wearing all green clothing.  St. Patrick’s Day is always celebrated on March 17th because it is said that was the day he died. So, where do the leprechauns come in? Well, our idea of leprechauns are very different than the traditional leprechauns that are connected to the Celtic folk religions that predate Christianity.  In the traditional sense, these beings, or spirits, would get angry if people went near sacred places.  So, how did our version of leprechauns become so silly? They are taken from cartoons that we actually used against the Irish in the 19th Century. St. Patrick’s Day History.

Favorite recipes: St. Patrick’s Day Recipes.

Irish Soda Bread with Raisins

Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2 cups all purpose flour
5 tablespoons sugar, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons butter, chilled, cut into cubes
1 cup buttermilk
2/3 cup raisins

Did you know…..? Irish soda bread gets its name and distinctive texture from the use of baking soda rather than yeast as a leavening agent.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Spray 8-inch-diameter cake pan with nonstick spray. Whisk flour, 4 tablespoons sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in large bowl to blend. Add butter. Using fingertips, rub in until coarse meal forms. Make well in center of flour mixture. Add buttermilk. Gradually stir dry ingredients into milk to blend. Mix in raisins. Using floured hands, shape dough into ball. Transfer to prepared pan and flatten slightly (dough will not come to edges of pan). Sprinkle dough with remaining 1 tablespoon sugar.

Bake bread until brown and tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Cool bread in pan 10 minutes. Transfer to rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

5 pounds corned brisket of beef
6 peppercorns, or packaged pickling spices
3 carrots, peeled and quartered
3 onions, peeled and quartered
1 medium-sized green cabbage, quartered or cut in wedges Melted butter (about 4 tablespoons)

Place the corned beef in water to cover with the peppercorns or mixed pickling spices (in supermarkets, these often come packaged with the corned beef). Cover the pot or kettle, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 hours or until tender, skimming occasionally. During the last hour, add the carrots and onions and cover again. During the last 15 minutes, add the cabbage. Transfer meat and vegetables to a platter and brush the vegetables with the melted butter. Serve with boiled parsley potatoes, cooked separately. (The stock can be saved to add to a pot roast or stew instead of other liquid.)

Have a lucky day!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspiration, move me brightly

♪♫♪ The storyteller makes no choice, soon you will not hear his voice / His job is to shed light, and not to master

You likely noticed already that I consider music an enormous influence in my life. It’s hard for me to imagine going through a day without listening to my playlists because I rely on music so much to get through the day. Frankly, I’m addicted to my headphones. Whether I’m running laps on the track at the rec, cramming schoolwork at the library, or just walking across the Quad from LCA to BSB, my fingers always compulsively reach for my earbuds to catch even a few minutes of a song. And I don’t listen to the first song on shuffle either – I am very meticulous and picky about the song I listen to at an exact moment, because music plays one of the biggest influences on my mood, demeanor, and emotions at any time.

In my psychology class, we covered memory and its effects on the brain during our last unit. Something we covered was retrieval cues and how the brain uses encoding specificity in order to preserve long term memory and make the process of remembering more smooth and permanent. While there are many songs that I am apathetic towards, I believe that certain songs – especially those that have grown so familiar to me that I am able to anticipate every beat, every dynamic, every rhythm – have encoded themselves so firmly into my memory that they evoke the strongest grip of emotion for me. They remind me of a time, place, or person, and I am taken from wherever I am to that time. Sometimes the experience is too hard for me to handle and I find I have to skip the song even before it starts playing.

I’m sure this all sounds very melodramatic, but music has always been that powerful for me, and that is why it has always been my greatest mechanism of escape and remembrance. It’s why I am constantly making playlist after playlist that are titled with names, locations, dates, or obscure meanings only I could discern. The memory unit in psychology was fascinating to me because it helped me realize how music plays such a profound influence in my everyday life. It astounds me that procedural memory, an aspect of long-term memory, involves actual physical changes in the brain when it is being stored. To me, this signifies that certain songs – and by their associations, certain people and places – have literally changed the structure of my brain because of the impact they have had on my life.

All of these thoughts in class made me happy that I switched to a Neuroscience major. It excites me to be able to explore the dynamic changes in the brain when we undergo powerful emotions and experiences in life.

In contrast to the songs that I skip because they might make me too upset to listen to them, there are also many songs that hold the exact opposite effect for me! I listen to them specifically because they are personally uplifting and improve my mood at the moment. Even if they can be childish or silly, sometimes just hearing them can improve my worst day and motivate me. In case you ever find yourself in need of some uplifting music, check out just a few songs on my uplifting playlist:

  • Peaches by New Heights
  • Slow Me Down by Emmy Rossum
  • Romantic Flight – John Powell
  • Nothing Ever Happens by Rachel Platten
  • Wunderkind by Alanis Morissette
  • Stay Stay Stay by Taylor Swift
  • Olsen Olsen by Sigur Ros
  • Boats and Birds – Gregory and the Hawk
  • Anna Sun – Walk the Moon
  • Daydream by Tycho

If you’re ever feeling down, consider looking up one of these songs! Perhaps they may lift your spirits as they do for me.

You’re back in terrapin, for good or ill again, for good or ill again. ♪♫♪

Terrapin Station - Grateful Dead

Take some time

I was sitting in Management today, waiting impatiently the for the midterm to start. I completely forgot my professor (who I have had before) likes to teach about the next chapter/unit right before we have the midterm for the previous chapters. I’m pretty sure he was just trying to confuse us all. Regardless, he was talking about creativity in relation to business and negotiations.

The first thing he started saying was that amidst our hectic schedules, we should set aside time to have a meeting with ourselves every week. This was especially funny to me due to my delusion state from midterm studying, but either way, I thought he was losing it. Until I heard where he was going with the argument.

He was telling us that people are too busy living their lives so fast-paced that they don’t take the time to think retrospectively and consider if what they are doing with their life makes them happy. We are constantly moving, trying to improve our careers, social life, whatever it may be. And not even for a second may we stop and consider what we are doing in relation to the fact that we only get one shot to do this right, and by right I mean right by each of us personally.

This is an incredibly valid point. We’re always on the go from class to class, work to home, internship to internship. But eventually that turns into semester to semester, year to year, decade to decade, and that adds up fast. Speaking personally, I can’t believe I’m already a junior. I don’t know where my time here has gone, and although I cherish all of my experiences, I have had the occasional meltdown because there is still so much that I want to pack into my time at UIC.

My professor was talking about people having that same exact realization, but on a broader scale. What happens when we get to the point in our lives where we realize we haven’t been doing everything we wanted to? We’ve just been going through the motions, advancing our career because that’s what we thought we were supposed to do. Buying property because everyone’s doing it. All that good stuff.

While I think the whole scheduling a meeting with yourself thing is pretty goofy, I wholly understand exactly what he means about it all. If we don’t all stop, take a breather, and assess our actions and goals as often as possible throughout our lives, how can we honestly say we’re happy and are doing what we want to do?

Take some time, whether it’s five minutes or just a resounding thought you keep in the back of your head. Make sure you’re truly happy and where you want to be in your life. Do you see happiness ahead?

To the point you feel your cells moving against your nerves

I can’t define what stress and anxiety feel like, but I can describe it as the title states: to the point you feel your cells moving against your nerves. I get that feeling when I’m playing video games. Put me in Gears of War 3 and I’ll play until it’s done because there’s no time during the story for a break and you’re constantly shooting and firing away at aliens / mutants without a blink in your eye. It makes me shiver. I didn’t think I could have this feeling when it comes to school, but man do I have the chills right now!

A glimpse at Google calendar would say it all. There’s loads of colored boxes to indicate all of the MCAT studying I have postponed secondary to my inability to motivate myself each day to complete much more (red color) as well as all of my classes, quizzes, club meetings and events that require my attendance (or that I just badly want to go – in blue color). To top it off, there’s the occasional green color that lists the scribe shifts I work (and those are quite the time-space lovers).

If you forward to the future post-MCAT, it’s a wonderful week of spring break (slight sarcasm on the “wonderful”). I am working many 5pm-2am shifts as well as working during the day at research (since I need that time to study for the MCAT now, I have to move everything to that free week). As much as I miss my family and grandmother, it might have to be the week of graduation before I see them again! The pile-up of studying to do is enormous. I am starting to think it may even push the limits of everything I know. It’s crazy to think I have been here for four years and each semester just building on each other in regards to learning, implementing and application to the future. If this is what college is really about, then I’d say I got my money’s worth. Although, I’m not looking forward to paying $25,000 in loans post-graduating. I will need to apply to more jobs to sustain myself if I want to be functional!

I spoke with a Human Rights Campaign worker while on campus and he stated he has been out for 2 years now and stated he had more money during college than coming out of college. It’s so bizarre because you’d think you wouldn’t have any money (assuming you did not work) during school, but that post-college you’d be making more money (again, assuming you found a decent job) and not have as many problems with food, housing etc. Well, totally not the case because we forget about our loans and all of the people we need to repay for helping us get here. He said he still gives at least $12 a month to HRC even though times are tight for him, which shows he’s very dedicated to the group! Unfortunately, I am in no position to help out ANYONE financially. You’d think having 4 part-time jobs would bring in quite an income, but compared to someone working full-time at one job with their Bachelor’s degree and no loans, I make very very very little. This money I make just goes straight to tuition honestly.

And even though it seems stupid to work during school when you could study and get straight A’s on every single assignment and class and join all of the clubs you want, I still think working is really key to helping you find a job post-graduation. The skills you need at a part-time job are TOTALLY applicable to the skills in a full-time job, including but not limited to: communication, time management, multitasking, improving professionalism, etc.

I am totally rambling about unrelated topics into one, but that’s just how my brain works and it’s suited me very well so far! (; I somehow got a 98/100 on my genetics exam (the first one). The 2 points I missed were totally silly mistakes. I can’t believe it! This is my second exam in college where I actually got an A on the rest (without a curve) in a science class. Even though I heard genetics lab was easy, I felt that during the test the questions were VERY difficult and specific (who knows, maybe the added stress of having my Polish exam, which I also did very well on, helped me study for biology, lol!). Has anyone done research on that? Language learning helping with science? I wonder if finding relationships within words helps apply to relationships among numbers and such. Probably, but we need science to prove it, haha!

Because of this weird feeling I have, I think I’m going to need to start exercising soon. Burn off the stress. Just go out and punch something with my MP3 rapping in my ears. Perhaps this is how medical students feel when they study…

Preparing for student elections

This past week, I have been beyond busy getting materials ready for the 2014-15 UIC Student Elections. As a Undergraduate Student Government (USG) member, I am dedicating myself to get the word out to all students about elections.
In case you never heard of UIC Student Elections, let me give you an overview. Each year, UIC administration opens up elections for the entire UIC student body to choose their representatives in a variety of areas. Included in this election is the Student Member of the Board of Trustees and the entire USG assembly.
The Student Trustee position sits on the University of Illinois Board of Trustees, representing the UIC student voice at the highest-level possible on campus for a full-year term. Furthermore, the USG President and Vice-President lead the undergraduate class in all decisions at the campus administrative level for a year-long term. The USG assembly members that run in the election are chosen to represent the undergraduate students in a variety of campus advocacy work for two full years.
This year, the Student Trustee and USG President elections are contested – two candidates are running against each other in the trustee elections and three in the presidential elections.
Elections will be held this year on March 12 and 13 at uicvote.uic.edu. PLEASE remember to vote! It is important that you have a say so in who represents YOU in all UIC administrative levels. To get to know more about the candidates, their platforms, to hear them speak, and when polls are open, please visit the USG website here.
Share your thoughts on the elections in the comment section – I’d love to see them!
Until next time…
Mike

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